“Clayton Christensen’s books on innovation are mandatory reading at Netflix.” – Reed Hastings, co-founder and CEO, Netflix For many companies, innovation is still hit or miss. They spend millions compiling the data to figure out what their customers want, but they often achieve only modest incremental innovations while completely missing the mark on the breakthrough… Read More


Firms have never known more about their customers, but their innovation processes remain hit-or-miss. Why? Product developers focus too much on building customer profiles and looking for correlations in data. To create offerings that people truly want to buy, firms instead need to hone in on the job the customer is trying to get done.… Read More


A generation ago, a “Kodak moment” meant something that was worth saving and savoring. Today, the term increasingly serves as a corporate bogeyman that warns executives of the need to stand up and respond when disruptive developments encroach on their market. Unfortunately, as time marches on the subtleties of what actually happened to Eastman Kodak […]… Read More


Today’s corporate watchword word is transformation, and for good reason. One study suggests that 75% of the S&P 500 will turn over in the next 15 years. Another says that one in three companies will delist in the next five years. A third shows that the “topple rate” of industry leaders falling from their perch […]… Read More


Through the past 15 years my colleagues and I have wrestled with disruption in many contexts. That’s no surprise, since Clayton Christensen co-founded our company in 2000, five years after his Harvard Business Review article with Joseph L. Bower “Disruptive Technologies: Catching the Wave” introduced the idea of disruption to the mainstream market. Christensen and two co-authors […]… Read More


Detecting marketplace “fault lines” is the key to building the case for preemptive change. Read the article in the new issue of Harvard Business Review.… Read More